Student Teaching – The Great Gatsby Unit

I am including this unit because it is the most extensive teaching unit that I have constructed and taught

The Great Gatsby

From All Angles

Mr. Seematter’s Junior English

Spring 2007

 

Contents

Aligned with KPA Criteria

 

Criterion 1: Contextual Information and Learning Environment Adaptations

            Contextual Information is found in a self titled section.

            Learning Environment Adaptations are found in the self titled section.

 

Criterion 2: Learning Goals and Objectives

            Learning Goals and Objectives are found on the Unit Goals page and within the individual lesson plans.

 

Criterion 3: Instructional Design and Implementation

            Instructional Design and Implementation information can be found in the Lesson Plans and in the Adaptations.

 

Criterion 4: Demonstration of Integration  Skills

            Demonstration of Integration of Skills information can be found in individual lesson plans. Specifically, those skills are found in various discussions and the     final paper. Also, after the adaptations section of the unit there is a narrative about the ways in which topics are integrated.

 

Criterion 6: Analysis of Assessment Procedures

The Analysis and Assessment Procedures proceed each lesson plan and are accompanied by the daily objectives and standards met. The narrative explanation is found at the end of the unit.

 

Criterion 7: Reflection and Self-Evaluation

            Reflection and Self-Evaluation is featured in my Reflection section at the end of the unit.

 

Contextual Information or Narrative Description of the School

            I will be facilitating this unit at Topeka West high school. The school is one of three high schools in the 501 school district. The USD 501 district has 13734 students and is split at 48% females and 52 % males of those student 63% are economically disadvantaged. The district is comprised of 47% white students, 22% black, 16% Hispanic, and another 15% of other. The district’s dropout rate in 2004 3.7%, which is relatively large considering that the state’s rate was 1.5%. (Kansas State Department of Education Report Card 2004-2005)

            Topeka West is made up of predominately white (non-Hispanic) students. White students comprise 68% of the total student population (721 out of 1066 total students.) Black students are the next largest percent of the population at 17% (180 out of 1066.) The rest of the student population is made up of Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans. This population breakdown is represented in the class that I will be teaching. The junior level English classes have a similar breakdown to that of the entire school’s population. (Public Schools Report)

            There are obvious socioeconomic levels present in the classroom and throughout the school, but those levels do not seem to be a big hindrance to the classroom or school community. The students appear to at least tolerate one another, evidenced by their performance in group work and daily interactions. The Kansas State Department of Education’s “Report Card for 2004-2005″ states that at Topeka West only 32.55% of the students are economically disadvantaged, as opposed to the district’s 63.13%. But despite the improved socioeconomic level for the students of Topeka West the dropout rate was still at 3.7% just below that of the district. (Kansas State Department of Education Report Card 2004-2005)

            The district remains accredited which is the only indicator I have to measure the cognitive levels of the students. But this year there were 13 schools in 501 that did not meet their annual yearly progress. (Hollingsworth, Online)

However discouraging this might seem it is important to note that AYP is merely one indicator of the success of schools and should not be the sole determinant used.

            Topeka West as a school did not fare so well on AYP this year, but just in math according to The Topeka Capital Journal. The other areas measure at West met standards. As for the specific classroom which I observed and will be teaching, well there are no AYP tests I can examine. Thus, I am forced to find other methods to evaluate the students.

            The students do not make my efforts easy because many of the students put forth only enough effort to get by, thus they received B’s and C’s on class work. But many of those same students will apply themselves from time to time and display brilliant work. So, the cognitive levels of students using Piaget’s model would vary. Students are at the formal operational, which I have come to conclude by over hearing some of the conversations and looking at the work that students have done. Often times, students do not display their full ability in school related work, but upon hearing students analyze and hypothesize about sports, television shows, social groups, work relations, and so forth it is apparent they are at the formal operational level.

            Knowing that students could do work at this level, but choose to perform at the concrete operational level is very frustrating. Students, who can analyze the happenings of Laguna Beach with amazing thoroughness, choose to only write a few sentences in response to Walden or The Great Gatsby. But this same attitude toward school can be observed in students at the grade school level on up to college, so this class is not unique in that aspect. The key then is to get students to engage themselves in the activities set up for the class.

            It is also important to note that there are students who are not having basic needs met. In Maslow’s hierarchy of needs food, water, and sleep are big parts of the bottom level of the pyramid, and if these needs are not met then students are not as able to focus on the upper levels of the pyramid. For example, if a student comes into the classroom hungry then a discussion about morality as it is portrayed in Lord of the Flies is almost impossible, because basic needs are not met. The same logic can be applied to students that enter the classroom having not slept the night before or whose parents are getting a divorce and feel unloved. For these students creativity and spontaneity become almost impossible.

            Mr. Werner’s class that I am observing at Topeka West is his class that has the most students with disabilities. Werner told me that there was no particular reason why the school did this, as far as he knew. There is a paraprofessional in the class that takes notes everyday for the respective students. It will be very important that I work well with her and any other paraprofessionals on a daily basis so the students she/they work with will get the necessary help. There are at least 6 students in that class that have individualized education plans. I do not believe that any students have significant visual or physical disabilities. But the class does have more than an average number of struggling learners in it.

            With this in mind it is necessary for educators to have and display compassion. I know that students at Topeka West and in my classroom have to deal with issues I thought unimaginable when I was that age. In most cases I will be unable to empathize with them, but I will always have to be sympathetic and understanding.

 

The Great Gatsby

By F. Scott Fitzgerald

Mr. Seematter’s Junior English

 

Main Goal: The students will use literary concepts to respond to and interpret the text. 

Standard 1:

Reading: The student reads and comprehends text across the curriculum.

 

       Students will identify the major characters, settings, and themes while reading the           novel. (Reading)

            Students will analyze the choices made by the director, writer and director while            watching the video.  (Viewing)

Standard 2:

            Literature:  The student responds to a variety of texts.

 

Students will show (act out) their written interpretations of a scene to the class. (Speaking/Listening)

            Students will explain their opinions while discussing in groups. (Social/Listening)

 

Standard 3:

            Writing:  The student will write effectively for a variety of audiences, purposes,             and contexts.

 

 

Students will compose a dramatic interpretation of a scene in the novel. (Writing)

 

Standard 4:

Research:  The student applies reading and writing skills to demonstrate learning.

 

       Students will support their thoughts/opinions with research in their finals papers.            

            (Writing)

 

I chose the preceding objectives because I will be teaching this unit to students on a number of different learning levels, so I cannot tailor the whole unit to any particular group. Thus, I have developed a unit that will challenge all types of learners; that notion is reflected by the objectives that I have built my unit around.

(Lesson plans cannot be formatted correctly; however, they are available upon request.)

Day 1

Objectives:

            The students will:

            Use textual clues to create meaning from the text.

            Improve their writing by responding to a picture.

            Enhance their writing ability by making a journal entry. 

Standards

1.      Reading- The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive.)

2.      Writing- The students use a variety of modes of writing for different purposes and audiences.

3.      Writing – The student uses writing as a tool for learning throughout the curriculum.

 

Evaluation-

Students will have their vocabulary/character quizzes graded for a pretest assessment.

Also, students will be given points for participation in the “describe a picture” activity.

 

Day 2

 

Objectives:

            The students will:

            Make predictions about the text.

            Work on their interpretative skills.

            Analyze different aspects of different characters.

            Enhance their writing ability by making a journal entry.

 

Standards

1.      Reading – The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive.)

2.      Literature – The students use literary concepts to interpret and respond to text.

3.      Writing – The student uses writing as a tool for learning throughout the curriculum.

 

 

Evaluation- 

Students will be given points for their journal entries and predictions.

Students will earn points for their participation in their character map groups. At the end of the unit these will be graded for content, effort and accuracy. 100 points are possible.

 

Day 3

 

Objectives:

            The students will:

            Improve their vocabulary by defining words in relation to their own lives.

            Respond to the text using a variety of methods.

            Enhance their writing ability by making a journal entry.

 

Standards

  1. Reading – The student improves vocabulary.
  2. Reading – The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive.)
  3. Writing – The student uses writing as a tool for learning throughout the curriculum.

 

 

Evaluation-

Students will be given points for their journal entries.

Students will earn 35 points for completing the vocabulary activity with 100% accuracy. Each one that the student is incorrect on will result in a 5 point deduction.

 

Day 4

 

Objectives:

            The students will:

            Analyze setting, characters, motifs, symbolism and plot.

            Enhance their understanding of the novel by making predictions

            Strengthen their reading skills by listening to someone else read.

 

Standards

  1. Reading – The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive.)
  2. Reading- The student reads fluently.
  3. Literature- The students use literary concepts to interpret and respond to text.

 

 

 

Evaluation-

Student will be able to add or detract from their total character map points, depending on how they behave.

Overall behavior will be assessed – how quiet they are during the tape and if they are paying attention.

Journal points will be given.

 

Day 5

 

Objectives

            Students will:   

            Improve their writing abilities by using their prior knowledge or experience.

            Generate responses to the text using the “Map it Out” strategy handout.

Standards

1. Writing – The students use ideas that are well developed, clear, and interesting.

2. Reading – The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive.)

 

Evaluation-

Character map points can be lost or earned.

The in-class “American Dream” activity will be graded, but because it is in-class I am basically looking to see if the student took the activity seriously.

The “Map it Out” activity will be graded primarily for content. (See attached rubric)

 

Day 6

 

Objectives:

            Students will:

            Enhance their writing ability by making a journal entry. 

            Improve their analyzing skills by discussing the novel in terms of social class.

            Further their understanding of the setting by making a drawing of East and West             Egg.

            Justify their decisions on the map using appropriate language.

 

Standards

1.      Writing – The student uses writing as a tool for learning throughout the curriculum.

2.       Reading – The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive.)

3.      Literature – The students use literary concepts to interpret and respond to a variety of texts.

 

 

Evaluation-

Journal points will be given.

Participation points can be earned for discussion about social class.

Students will be graded on “The East and West Egg map” through accuracy and participation. 100% accuracy on their 5 sentence justification of the map is expected for the group to earn full points.

 

Day 7

 

Objectives:

            Students will:

            Enhance their writing ability by making a journal entry. 

            Make inferences about the relationship between the characters, Tom Buchanan and Jay Gatsby, in writing the “legal script.”

Standards

  1. Writing – The student uses writing as a tool for learning throughout the curriculum.
  2. Reading – The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive.)

 

 

Evaluation-

Journal points will be given.

 

Day 8

Objectives:

            Students will:

            Enhance their writing ability by making a journal entry. 

            Make inferences about the relationship between the characters, Tom Buchanan and Jay Gatsby, in writing the “legal script.”

            Think critically

 

 

Standards

  1. Writing – The student uses writing as a tool for learning throughout the curriculum.
  2. Reading – The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive.)

 

 

Evaluation-

Journal points will be given.

Students will earn 25 points by acting out their legal scripts. The other 25 points will be earned by being accurate within their scripts (not what is said while acting.)

 

Day 9

 

Objectives:

            The students will:

            Improve their understanding of the relationship between Tom Buchanan and Jay Gatsby by watching other students’ interpretations.

            Analyze different aspects of different characters.

 

Standards

  1. Reading – The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive.)
  2. Literature – The students use literary concepts to interpret and respond to a variety of texts.

 

Evaluation-

Character map points will be earned or lost.

Students will earn 25 points by acting out their legal scripts. The other 25 points will be earned by being accurate within their scripts (not what is said while acting.)

 

Day 10

 

Objectives:

            The students will:

            Brainstorm quality topics from information they find.

            Generate a quality topic for their papers. 

 

Standard

            1. Research – The students apply reading and writing skills to demonstrate learning.

 

Evaluation-

The students might be graded on their impromptu quiz if they decide to misbehave in the library.

 

Day 11

 

Objectives:

            Students will:

            Enhance their writing ability by making a journal entry. 

            Respond to the text by discussing its implications to today’s society

            Identify the use of literary devices in the text during their discussions.

            Analyze characters, plot, and setting during their discussions.

Standards

  1. Writing – The student uses writing as a tool for learning throughout the curriculum.
  2. Literature – The students use literary concepts to interpret and respond to a variety of texts.
  3. Literature – The student understands the significance of literature and its contributions to various cultures.

 

Evaluation-

Journal points will be given.

Student can earn participation points during the conversation about the novel’s applicability to today’s society.

 

Day 12

 

Objective:

            The students will:

            Improve their understanding of how the literature relates to its time period.

            Enhance their writing abilities by using a writing process.

            Analyze the quality of the materials they find while doing research.

 

 

Standard

1.      Literature The student understands the significance of literature and its contributions to various cultures.

2.      Writing – The students use a writing process that includes preparing, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing to produce a written text.

3.       Research – The students apply reading and writing skills to demonstrate learning.

 

Evaluation-

The students might be graded on their impromptu quiz if they decide to misbehave in the library.

 

Day 13

 

Objectives:

            The students will:

            Improve their vocabulary by having to take a test over it.

 

Standards

            1. Reading – The student expands vocabulary.

 

 

Evaluation-

Students will be graded on their character/vocabulary quiz.

 

Summative Evaluation -

Students will be graded by the attached rubric on their final papers.

 

Learning Environment Adaptations

 

Rather than write in specific adaptations for each day I have a general list of adaptations that I will practice throughout the semester.

 

Each of the following is general adaptations that will benefit everyone, but particularly those students with exceptionalities.

I want to set high expectations for the students. Students will only rise to expectations that are set high. If a student does not have to work hard he/she will not. No matter the student’s ability level there is no reason to not have high expectations.

 

By setting up a positive learning environment students will feel comfortable enough to share his/her thoughts. When risks are taken true learning is more likely to occur.

 

Many students with exceptionalities need to have routine in their lives. By previewing the next day’s activities and generally doing the same things in class, I will help students feel more comfortable in class. This will make it easier for students to feel comfortable in class and as mentioned earlier if there is a positive environment for students they will be more likely to learn.

 

I want to create a classroom that constantly has engaging activities that will involve the students. I have set up the unit so that there are a lot of group work activities and other activities that will get the students involved in class.

 

Social interaction is a very important part of any classroom. When students are allowed to work in groups they seem to perform better. I have designed a number of activities that allow students to work in groups.

 

I will have a general set of rules with consequences. This is part of having clear expectations for students. Students with behavior disorders and/or learning disabilities need this level of consistency in their lives.

 

By making my directions clear I will help everyone in the classroom.  Clear directions help all students in the classroom, but particularly those with learning disabilities. Also, having handouts with directions on them will help out students that have paras because the paraprofessional will not have to rely on word of mouth directions.

 

Creating and having relevant activities is very important. I do not want the students to feel as if I am just having them do busy work. Again, this strategy is beneficial to everyone in the classroom. Students need to feel that the things they are doing in class have a purpose. I have developed such activities, and because of the classroom climate that I will have set up students will be able to ask me about the importance of the activity at any time.

 

The aforementioned group work is a very important part of any classroom. It fulfills students’ needs for social interaction and allows for a level of anonymity that is comforting to students. Having students work in groups allows them to decide their own levels of participation and lets them be responsible for their own learning.

 

I will always be available to any student needing assistance. This is comforting to students having difficulty, but is beneficial across the board.

 

By stopping students for comprehension checks I can ensure some learning is happening. I will use questions that are all across Bloom’s Taxonomy so that students will have to think about what is actually going on while they read.

 

I will preview and review the day’s activities which will help students retain what has happened and will prepare students for what is going to happen. This will help any student that needs routine in their lives; it will also help promote consistency.

 

I have incorporated both video and audio tape into the unit I have designed. This will help audio and visual learners. It will also help break up the monotony of other classroom activities.

 

One of the most important things to give struggling learners is time. This concept is one that I will need to practice in every aspect of my teaching.  I need to give students time to think, time to answer, time to write, time to work and so forth. By giving students with disabilities time to do things, it allows them to think about what is being asked of them and formulate a “good” response. When such students feel pressured or constrained they will begin to shut down in class.

 

Journals will be a method for me to check for comprehension. This will help any struggling learners because I will be able to identify them early on, and provide the necessary help.

 

Sticky notes will help students focus their reading and will be a way for me to retroactively check for comprehension. This method will benefit struggling learners and readers. Again this method will assist me in identifying if students are having difficulty with the reading. Students who have learning disabilities, add/adhd, ESL or are simply struggling learners will all aid from having to use sticky notes because then they can focus their reading and ask someone for assistance.

 

Handouts- As often as possible I will have handouts that detail assignments and activities. The character maps, “map it out,” and other handouts that give directions to assignments and activities will all help students in general. The character maps will also be redistributed and will serve as a study guides for the students’ final test. Any student with a reading disability will then have time to read over the material. An ESL student will have time to translate the sheet if needed, comprehend and then refer to the directions. Students with add/adhd will have something to focus their attention. If a student is visually impaired they will have their own copy rather than having to read it off the board. Handouts will also ensure that the paraprofessionals will receive accurate instructions regarding the assignments.

 

 

The vocabulary word handouts fall into this category. I do not expect the students to take time to look up every word they know, so by giving them the 5-10 words per chapter that I think they should know I am helping them break down the reading. Also by having a vocabulary activity at the beginning of the unit, I give them a strategy for learning vocabulary words. Other strategies may need to be discussed later on in the semester, but connecting words to their lives is a very effective one. Many of these words will appear on the final test over the unit.

 

Variety of activities- By having a number of different activities students should never be bored with my class. Almost every class period there are a number of different and varied activities to break up the monotony of the classroom and engage as many learners as possible. The variety of activities should also provide avenues for more students to find an area to excel. Maybe not all students are good at envisioning what East and West Egg look like, but hopefully I have provided another activity that will engage them.

 

Criterion 4 – Demonstration of Integration Skills

 

During discussions with the students I will ask questions that will facilitate their thinking about how the novel relates to other areas of academia and life. Specifically, the students will have to think about these issues when they write their final paper. Literature, especially this novel, is well suited to be applied to other areas of school and life.  F. Scott Fitzgerald did an excellent job of intertwining the themes of that time period into his novel, and to not discuss that with students would be disservice to them.

 

Criterion 6: Analysis of Assessment Procedures

The diagnostic test is the first test that I give the students. It will be composed of true and false, matching, and practical application parts. The content will be mainly vocabulary, but the true and false questions will do with character details. I chose this method to test students because it is objective and I wanted an objective part of the final test. The vocabulary portion of the test will give me evidence as to what I need to teach and how much of it.

 

The formative tests are not a huge focus of mine. I want to let the students learn during the course of the semester and not have them focus on different tests. By writing in journals, doing character maps, discussing, and writing for various assignments, I will be able to monitor their comprehension. These areas of learning are varied and diverse. Students will be expected and prompted to think outside of the box in many cases. I will facilitate conversations that will help students make connections with the text. If the students get bogged down by having to prepare for tests and quizzes all the time, I believe that there will be more memorization done than learning. However, I have it built into my lesson plans that if students misbehave, in the library for example, they will have to take an impromptu quiz.

 

The summative evaluation will be comprised of the test given at the beginning of the semester and a final paper. The final paper is detailed in my lesson plans, but to expand on it more. I want the students to take an element from the 1920’s and connect it to the literature. The students will need to fuse real life details from the time period to the novel itself. There is a rubric set up and included for the grading of the paper. I chose a paper because it will help students to realize how important literature is to our society. By connecting this novel to their world and the world of years ago, I hope students will practice this year’s to come.

 

Criterion 7

 

Today, I was finally able to teach in Mr. Werner’s class. It was awesome. I did a lesson over Civil Disobedience and facilitated a brief discussion about how it related to a speech by Ghandi.  Before I even knew it I had read the brief portion of Ghandi’s speech to the students and they were all looking up at me, waiting. So, I posed a few impromptu questions to then and still they looked at me. So, I asked it again, and then I waited on them. The uncomfortable silence grew until someone spoke up. In my mind I had won the battle, from then on the students would know that being non-responsive was not an option.

 

After the brief discussion we moved on to the scheduled activity over Thoreau’s Walden. The students had already read the assignment and Mr. Werner and I handed out the sheets, then I dictated the instructions to the students. I told them that they were to decide what 10 things they would take with them to live in the woods for a week. They could only bring things they could carry and there was no running water or electricity. It had previously been decided that cell phones were not allowed.

 

After deciding on the 10 things the students were to write a few sentences responding to the text and their trip to the woods. How their trip had affected them, how the items would prove beneficial and other such questions.

 

After that brief period my lesson was done. I think I did a really good job of working with the students and garnering a response from them. I believe that to be the hardest part of being a teacher, getting the students involved. When I was in high school, I remember student teachers that could never get my classes to talk. They asked the wrong questions and taught material in a way that we were not comfortable.

 

I obviously did something right in teaching for this period, the students seemed to be interested in what I had to say and many of them have told me that they are excited for me to be their teacher.

 

The following is the miscellaneous information that accompanies my unit. The rubric, tests, assignments etc.

 

The “American Dream”

In-Class writing activity

Mr. Seematter’s Junior English Class

February 28, 2007

 

“The Roaring 20’s” is how many people describe the time period that Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby depicts. There are obsessions with late nights, dance, booze, money and so forth. Many people of that time period thought that they were pursuing the “American Dream,” only to eventually find out that such a life was meaningless.

 

Write at least 2 paragraphs about your version of the “American Dream.”

Think about these things-

What is your version of the “American Dream?” What are the most important things in your life right now? Are they going to be worth pursing years from now? What types of things are fulfilling long term?

 

Journal Topics -

 

I have the ideas and will go about using them in a rather sequential manner; however I do not want to become too entrenched in the idea of a specific topic. I would rather be adaptive, and choose the topics on a daily basis. This process would be based on what happened the class period before and on what we were going to be doing in class that day.

 

Have you ever wanted to relive a moment from your past, to redo it? Describe the situation. How and why would you change the past?

 

What does Tom’s behavior reveal about his character? Do you know people that act like this?

 

What more have you learned about Nick in this chapter? Is he similar or different than the people he spends his time with? How might that affect the outcome of the novel?

 

What rumors have been told about Gatsby? Why does Fitzgerald reveal rumors rather than fact?

 

Nick thinks he’s one of the few honest people he knows, why? Do you think he is honest?

 

How did Gatsby measure the success of his party? How does this connect with the plot? Why is it important? How does it affect Nick?

 

Describe Daisy and Gatsby’s new relationship.

 

Describe the fight between Gatsby and Tom. What do these men think of each other? How are they similar and how are they different?

 

Why does Nick call Tom and Daisy “careless people”? Do you agree with the description? Why or why not?

 

Why are we still reading a book written in the 1920’s? What gives a book its longevity? And which of its themes are eternal in the American psyche.

 

Does this novel have villains and heroes? Why, why not? If yes, who fits into these categories and why?

 

(http://www.teachervision.fen.com/literature/lesson-plan/2924.html?detoured=1)

 

Journal Topics -

 

I have the ideas and will go about using them in a rather sequential manner; however I do not want to become too entrenched in the idea of a specific topic. I would rather be adaptive, and choose the topics on a daily basis. This process would be based on what happened the class period before and on what we were going to be doing in class that day.

 

Have you ever wanted to relive a moment from your past, to redo it? Describe the situation. How and why would you change the past?

 

What does Tom’s behavior reveal about his character? Do you know people that act like this?

 

What more have you learned about Nick in this chapter? Is he similar or different than the people he spends his time with? How might that affect the outcome of the novel?

 

What rumors have been told about Gatsby? Why does Fitzgerald reveal rumors rather than fact?

 

Nick thinks he’s one of the few honest people he knows, why? Do you think he is honest?

 

How did Gatsby measure the success of his party? How does this connect with the plot? Why is it important? How does it affect Nick?

 

Describe Daisy and Gatsby’s new relationship.

 

Describe the fight between Gatsby and Tom. What do these men think of each other? How are they similar and how are they different?

 

Why does Nick call Tom and Daisy “careless people”? Do you agree with the description? Why or why not?

 

Why are we still reading a book written in the 1920’s? What gives a book its longevity? And which of its themes are eternal in the American psyche.

 

Does this novel have villains and heroes? Why, why not? If yes, who fits into these categories and why?

 

(http://www.teachervision.fen.com/literature/lesson-plan/2924.html?detoured=1)

 

Pictures for a class period. 

http://employees.oneonta.edu/angellkg/slide65.jpg

http://fan.astarael.net/gatsby/images/paradise.gif

http://faculty.pittstate.edu/~knichols/jazzscene.jpg

http://bioinfo.mbb.yale.edu/~mbg/dom/fun3/great-gatsby/im.jpg

http://www.craigorback.com/illustrations/enlargments/gatsby_1.jpg

http://www.filmreference.com/images/sjff_03_img1052.jpg

 

Vocabulary and Character Quiz

Pre-test (and final)

Mr. Seematter’s Junior English

March 23, 2006

 

T/F

 

  1. T/F Daisy is married to Tom Buchanan at the beginning of the novel.
  2. T/F Jay Gatsby is the novel’s narrator.
  3. T/F Myrtle Wilson is having an affair with Nick Carraway.
  4. T/F Nick Carraway’s cousin is Daisy Buchanan.
  5. T/F Tom and Daisy Buchanan live in Philadelphia, PA.
  6. T/F Jay Gatsby never quit having parties throughout the novel.
  7. T/F Nick Carraway moves back to the Midwest.
  8. T/F Jordan and Jay Gatsby are involved with one another.
  9. T/F Tom Buchanan shoots Jay Gatsby.
  10.  T/F Klipspringer calls Nick Carraway about a pair of tennis shoes after Jay Gatsby Dies. 

 

Vocabulary – Matching

 

1. _____Incredulous

 

2. _____Supercilious

 

3. _____Infinite

 

4. _____Facet

 

5. _____Apathetic

 

6. _____Erroneous

 

7. _____Vehement

 

8. _____Obstinate

 

9. _____Elusive

 

10. _____Vicarious

 

 

  1. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy.
  2. unwilling to admit or accept what is offered as true, indicating or showing unbelief inflexible; stubborn; not yielding.
  3. aspect; phase; side.
  4. any of the definable aspects that make up a subject
  5. strongly emotional; intense or passionate.
  6. containing error; mistaken; incorrect; wrong
  7. hard to express or define; cleverly or skillfully evasive.
  8. indefinitely or exceedingly large
  9. not interested or concerned; indifferent or unresponsive.
  10. performed or suffered by one person as a substitute for another or to the benefit or advantage of another 

 

Use 10 of the following 15 words (or form of the words) in sentences that show me you know the definitions of the words.

 

Incoherent, Tentative, Elusive, Infinite, Reciprocal, Apathetic, Suppress, Elusive, Vicarious, Erroneous, Tentative, Anon, Surmise, Impetuous, Cordial

 

Chapter 1

Feign

Supercilious

Conscientious

Incredulous

Reciprocal

Wan

Complacent

Intimation

Infinite

Anon

 

Chapter 2

Contiguous

Facet

Cower

Interpose

Apathetic

Languid

Imply

Strident

Deft

Clad

 

Chapter 3

Permeate

Innuendo

Erroneous

Vehement

Cordial

Impetuous

Vacuous

Corpulent

Provincial

Din

Chapter 4

Knickerbockers

Fluctuate

Sporadic

Divine retribution

Rajah

Elicit

Valor

Somnabulatory

Denizen

Jauntily

 

Chapter 5

Rout

Suppressed

Innumerable

Ecstatic

Reproach

Serf

Obstinate

Exultation

Hulking

Nebulous

 

Chapter 6

Laudable

Insidious

Repose

Debauch

Antecedent

Ingratiate

Perturb

Dilatory

Desolate

Elusive

 

Chapter 7

Lapse

Insistent

Tentative

Abrupt

Tumult

Portentous

Irreverent

Vicarious

Rancor

Formidable

 

Chapter 8

Humidor

Indiscernible

Settee

In cahoots

Divot

Garrulous

Incoherent

Conceivable

Forlorn

Laden

 

Chapter 9

Pasquinade

Derange

Surmise

Superfluous

Elocution

Unutterable

Subtle

Orgiastic

Borne

Ceaselessly

 

Writing a Legal Script

(This lesson was adapted from Maeve T. 0’Driscoll Ardsley High School, NY)

http://www.teachers.net/lessons/posts/1564.html

 

Legal Team #1, the Defense: Gatsby has been accused of having an affair with Daisy. As part of the legal “dream team” responsible for exonerating (freeing) Gatsby from punishment, you must draft a defense. Using chapter 6 of The Great Gatsby as the main source, write an opening statement to your argument, showing that Gatsby is not at fault for what has happened. What legal arguments or strategies can you use to defend Ralph’s actions?

 

Quick Brainstorm (your first thoughts): _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Legal Team #2, the Prosecution: A defendant is innocent until proven guilty. It’s your duty to prove Gatsby’s guilt. Using chapter 6 of The Great Gatsby as the main source, draft an opening statement for your argument, showing that Gatsby is clearly responsible for the “affair.” What “facts” or “eyewitness accounts” can you gather to prove Gatsby’s behavior?

 

Quick Brainstorm (your first thoughts): _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Who can you call up as a witness? Whose testimony could help your case? What conversations are important in establishing guilt/innocence?

 

Step 1) With your partners, prepare a script on loose-leaf.

Be as creative as you’d like with “court room lingo.”

Choose a spokesperson. This speaker must be convincing.

A marriage, a man’s reputation, and maybe even love are at stake!

 

Step 2) Rehearse your spokesperson/lawyer.

What kind of gestures will his or she use? Help coach…and remember, there is no “I” in team!

 

Step 3) Be ready to present your arguments on ________________________.

 

Step 4) Remember the objective: to use your in-depth knowledge The Great Gatsby to bring about justice!

Justification:

I am including this document, because it is the basis for the KPA that I developed, and it is a testament to the comprehensive lesson plans that I am able to develop. Also, there is a range of different activities which incorporates writing, speaking, listening, collaborating, drawing, and creating. This aspect of my classroom would help students of various intelligences to perform to their highest level. 


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